Mike - UNC Student [Media Studies, PR, CompSci]
Newswriter and TV Reviewer at Escapist Magazine

Blog is mostly fandom/nerd stuff with some OC and
anger caused by patriarchy and white supremacy.

Fandoms include but are not limited to Whedon, Bioware, Supernatural, Marvel, Hannibal, Pacific Rim.

-Canticle of Threnodies 8:13 (source)

Recent Tweets @

I’m enjoying the story of Orzammar and I love fighting darkspawn and Oghren is cool and so is the music but every corner of Orzammar is ugly as shit to me and I cannot wait to be out of here.

Like, even the design is nice but these colors are killing me


Shepard did everything right. More than we could’ve hoped for.

Shepard did everything right. More than we could’ve hoped for.

(via lady-z13)

shwit:

Ocelot sketch for boatmancer

got a little carried away and decided to color it fdgfgsdfh

”(…)as passionate and reactionary as the groundswell she brings.”

(via lady-z13)

jackbisqueen:

peterfromtexas:

Who needs a dentist?

this is the most fuckin metal thing i have ever seen

jackbisqueen:

peterfromtexas:

Who needs a dentist?

this is the most fuckin metal thing i have ever seen

(via deanm0n)

bryankonietzko:

We recently saw gameplay footage from this Activision project and it looks awesome. Platinum is doing a fantastic job with the development. Tim Hedrick, series writer, cooked up the story and villain with Mike and me. And our buddies at Titmouse are animating the cut scenes, one of which you can see in the trailer in this link––very cool stuff. I’m not a gamer, but I might even play this thing! Hope you guys enjoy it. Our character designer Christie Tseng is doing the cover art, and there is some sort of contest where you can vote for which cover you want her to finish.

descentintotyranny:

US Supreme Court to Police: ‘Get a Warrant’ Before Searching Cell Phones — Kevin Gosztola
June 25 2014
The United States Supreme Court issued a unanimous decision instructing police that they must get a warrant if they want to search an arrested person’s cell phone.
“Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cell phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple—get a warrant,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the court’s opinion [PDF].
The decision applied to two cases. In one case, Riley v. California, involves an officer who seized a “smartphone” from a person who was under arrest and began to scroll through its contents at the scene of the arrest. He was looking through text messages and the phone’s contact list. In the second case, United States v. Wurie, an officer believed the person arrested had used a cell phone to arrange a drug deal. At the police station, an officer noticed that a “flip” phone was repeatedly receiving calls from a number labeled “my house.” The officer searched through the call log on the phone in order to obtain the home phone number.
The Supreme Court solidly affirmed that Americans have a Fourth Amendment privacy interest in keeping their cell phones from being subject to warrantless searches.
“These decisions are huge for digital privacy,” EFF Staff Attorney Hanni Fakhoury reacted. “The court recognized that the astounding amount of sensitive data stored on modern cell phones requires heightened privacy protection, and cannot be searched at a police officer’s whim. This should have implications for other forms of government electronic searches and surveillance, tightening the rules for police behavior and preserving our privacy rights in our increasingly digital world.”
Steven R. Shapiro, national legal director for the ACLU, reacted, “By recognizing that the digital revolution has transformed our expectations of privacy, today’s decision is itself revolutionary and will help to protect the privacy rights of all Americans. We have entered a new world but, as the court today recognized, our old values still apply and limit the government’s ability to rummage through the intimate details of our private lives.”
Read More

descentintotyranny:

US Supreme Court to Police: ‘Get a Warrant’ Before Searching Cell Phones — Kevin Gosztola

June 25 2014

The United States Supreme Court issued a unanimous decision instructing police that they must get a warrant if they want to search an arrested person’s cell phone.

“Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cell phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple—get a warrant,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the court’s opinion [PDF].

The decision applied to two cases. In one case, Riley v. California, involves an officer who seized a “smartphone” from a person who was under arrest and began to scroll through its contents at the scene of the arrest. He was looking through text messages and the phone’s contact list. In the second case, United States v. Wurie, an officer believed the person arrested had used a cell phone to arrange a drug deal. At the police station, an officer noticed that a “flip” phone was repeatedly receiving calls from a number labeled “my house.” The officer searched through the call log on the phone in order to obtain the home phone number.

The Supreme Court solidly affirmed that Americans have a Fourth Amendment privacy interest in keeping their cell phones from being subject to warrantless searches.

“These decisions are huge for digital privacy,” EFF Staff Attorney Hanni Fakhoury reacted. “The court recognized that the astounding amount of sensitive data stored on modern cell phones requires heightened privacy protection, and cannot be searched at a police officer’s whim. This should have implications for other forms of government electronic searches and surveillance, tightening the rules for police behavior and preserving our privacy rights in our increasingly digital world.”

Steven R. Shapiro, national legal director for the ACLU, reacted, “By recognizing that the digital revolution has transformed our expectations of privacy, today’s decision is itself revolutionary and will help to protect the privacy rights of all Americans. We have entered a new world but, as the court today recognized, our old values still apply and limit the government’s ability to rummage through the intimate details of our private lives.”

Read More

irresistible-revolution:

no but pls don’t expect me to root for a Wonder Woman movie unless y’all are explicitly demanding she be a WOC. White women got black widow, Katniss, whatever the fuck scarjo is playing in her new movie, danaerys targaryen, etc. I really won’t be turning out to see another white woman with super powers who’s supposed be a feminist icon.

sigh….

(via deanm0n)

Shepard + 41

(via glitchfemme)

riviere-cartia:

Have fun navigating Cabbage Ocean, you son of a bitch…

(via supersand-lesbian)

playstation:

No Man’s Sky

lemmming:

it was a 2 second video

I had to click it

I had to know what could possibly happen in two short seconds

(via vodkatampons)